The Mikan Drill

To love the game is the greatest of all…

Posts Tagged ‘Defensive Strategies

Defensive Strategies: Doug McDermott, Creighton

leave a comment »

This series will provide strategies on how defenses can best guard, or attempt to guard, some of the most dangerous offensive players and actions. Today’s post will try to show how collegiate defenses can slow down the offense of Doug McDermott from Creighton.

Doug McDermott returns for his senior season as the top returning scorer in collegiate basketball after averaging 23.1 points per game on 57% shooting from 2’s and 49% from 3’s. He is able to score in a variety of ways although he is first and foremost, a deadly accurate shooter. What can defenses do to try to stop him this year on the offensive end?

Post Doubles

Although McDermott is mainly known for his shooting, he is more often seen on the block for the Bluejays, where was he one of the best post players last season (as well as his sophomore season). If defenses let him work 1 on 1, they are going to be grabbing the ball out of the net more often than not.

Therefore, defenses need to send two defenders at McDermott and take away post moves as an option while turning him into a distributor. McDermott has decent vision and passing ability for a player of his size, so defenses need to be organized to pull this off or McDermott will be able to shred the defenses with easy passes to wide open teammates.

Here, Mason Plumlee rotates over to help on the post move, which leaves his man open for a dump off pass. Duke needs to rotate properly, which they do, as the opposite corner defender rotates down which leaves the only open pass a cross court skip pass. McDermott has no viable options and turns the ball over.

Image

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Joshua Riddell

October 8, 2013 at 12:04 am

Defensive Strategies: Damian Lillard

leave a comment »

This series will provide strategies on how defenses can best guard, or attempt to guard, some of the most dangerous offensive players and actions. Today’s post will try to show how defenses can slow down the offense of the reigning Rookie of the Year, Damian Lillard. 

There wasn’t much Damian Lillard couldn’t do on the offensive end in his rookie season, as he averaged 19 points on 46.9% shooting on 2 point field goals and 36.8% on 3 point field goals. Lillard will look to shore up some of the holes in his offensive game in his second season, as he hopes to lead a Portland team that had a great offseason back to the playoffs. It won’t be easy to defend him as he continues to grow and improve as a point guard but these strategies will put him in situations where he will be less effective.

Shade him left

It’s not a smart idea to force him completely left, as Lillard will be able to shred the defense by using the open space to his advantage but it is smart for the defense to shade him to the left side off the dribble. Lillard drove left more often last season, which is probably a result of the defense forcing the rookie to beat them with his off hand. However, he had the tendency to settle for jump shots instead of driving to the rim.

Looking at Lillard’s shot chart, he was average on mid-range jump shots from the left side of the court. He can improve on these pull up jump shots off the dribble to his left and the defense should shade him that way to encourage him into these positions.

Shotchart_1379380702312

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Joshua Riddell

September 18, 2013 at 2:37 am

Defensive Strategies: Paul George

with 2 comments

This series will provide strategies on how defenses can best guard, or attempt to guard, some of the most dangerous offensive players and actions. Today’s post will try to show how defenses can slow down the offense of the Indiana Pacers Paul George. 

Paul George had a superb third season, averaging 17.4 points per game in the regular season and cemented his status as an elite player by averaging nearly 20 points per game in the playoffs and leading his team to within a game of the NBA Finals. The Pacers will be a top Eastern Conference team again this season and slowing down George will be key to stopping the offensive attack of the Pacers.

Force him to create in the half court

George struggled when forced to create his own offense of the dribble, as he scored only 0.72 points per possession (PPP) in isolation situations last season and 0.71 PPP as a pick and roll ball handler. Most of his offense came in transition or spot up and cuts in half court sets. While there is still plenty of time in his young career to improve this part of his game, defenses would be wise to force George to create off the dribble which would give the defense the advantage in these situations.

When he tries to take defenders off the dribble, he isn’t able to get the whole way to the rim yet and has to settle for pull up jump shots. George doesn’t seem to quite have that skill yet of other elite offensive players of being able to beat defenders with his speed off his first step or with his strength to body through defenders to the rim. Defenders are able to stay in front of him while remaining on balance and George cannot get a layup attempt. This causes him to pull up for mid range shots instead of trying to get the whole way to the rim.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Joshua Riddell

September 16, 2013 at 12:50 pm

%d bloggers like this: